SM 6/29/07: Hello again, RaNae I’m sorry that it is so quiet in Switzerland. Actually I am working hard in my office. This morning is the only half day, I have not to go to work…

After a few housework and a short breakfast we come to my ideas for the spiral quilt. I love roses, but they do not grow in my garden (I think, I have not enough time for them) so I thought, I can make them in my quilt. An other point is, that I want to make a “simple” quilt, because not everybody who is buying your book, is already an expert (me too) in PP.

My imagination was to make a quilt with 9 blocks (3×3) of roses with irregular spirals. I wanted to create them in EQ5, but I was not succesful. At the weekend, I will draw them on paper.

RM: Sandra, I think that Debra Nance is not going to make the rose quilt that she designed. I know that she did it in EQ — why not ask her if you could use her rose block designs? I think she could easily send you the file via email.

Debra? What do you think? Would you be willing to share? Not the whole quilt design, which is yours, but those beautiful rose blocks that you used in #2 and #3? It’s up to you, yes or no. Neither Sandra nor I will be upset if you feel you don’t want to.

Sandras roses A2

SM 7-9-07: Finally I have a design. Of course, it is not what Debra’s design is. But as you wrote in your email today, for some people its more difficult to design. I want to go forward with this! but my troubles with eq5 will throw me back often.

So how can I go forward with my design? Is the middle of the hexagon too big? (actually there are 80 pieces per rose!! I wonder, when I sew that! 720 or more little pieces…)

and what about the setting? should I turn and flip some of the roses?

I bought some wonderful fabrics with small prints in orange. I think, that will look great. I tried to color it in EQ5.

oops, I just realize, that I choose another type of spiral… is that ok?

RM 7-10-07: Sandra, thank you for reformatting the image. I see you are becoming more proficient in EQ, too — congratulations!

Here are answers & responses to your comments and questions, then a few additional comments and suggestions of my own:

SM: Is the middle of the hexagon too big?

RM: No.

SM: There are 80 pieces per rose!! I wonder, when I sew that! 720 or more little pieces…

RM: Sandra, you can reduce the number of pieces by using use only one green triangle in each corner, not the three or more you have right now. Choose a fabric that has the variation or texture that you want (for example, a fabaric with leaves that look like rose leaves or a batik) so you’ll still get the texture but without all the work. In fact, it will probably improve the block: piecing in the corners will distract a bit from the piecing in the rose, but a solid piece in the corners will emphasize the piecing in the rose.

SM: I just realize, that I choose another type of spiral… is that ok?

RM: When you drew this rose you used a Nesting spiral. This is good, because you can pin and sew three trianges at a time. Place and sew triangles #1, 3 & 5, sew them, press them back, then place and sew triangles #2, 4 & 6, sew them and press them back. You’ll discover it goes pretty quickly.
SM: should I turn and flip some of the roses?

RM: You already have, and I think it’s enough, except that the two blocks to the left in the middle row are in the same position, so one of them should be rotated. The left block in the middle row is also in the same position as the block below it, so if you rotate the far left block in the middle row that may solve both problems. After moving blocks, double-check all the placements: look specifically to see that there are no adjacent blocks in the same position.

SM: what about the setting?

RM: Basically, it is good. It is with respect to this that I would like to make a few suggestions.

1. I think that the design would benefit a lot from a little more space between the roses. This can easily be accomplished with sashing. Sashing could be all the same width, or, if you would like to give the roses a bit more freedom in the placement, it can be different widths. The way to do this would be to add strips of fabric to the sides of the block in various widths.

2. When you add sashing you may find that you want to adjust the width of the inside border.

3. Another idea you might consider is to incorporate some leaves into the design. To do this you could either design them into the block (see Emme Krenek’s page) or applique them, perhaps in the border, or perhaps the simplest way: Find a fabric that has leaves that look like rose leaves in the right size and use it for the corners and sashes, or cut and applique it like broderie perse. Even a few leaves would send the viewer the message that these blocks should be viewed as roses, not just as interesting spirally objects.

4. Think about possibly using a fabric for the center of the roses that suggests the texture of the center of a rose.

That’s all — I hope these suggestions are helpful. Now it’s time for the fun of sewing!

Sandra roses 4

SM: Yes, you are stretching me! But that is more than good, it is a challenge. And I like it.

I was not really confident with my setting and your advices are what I needed for more practice in EQ5. At the end of this project, I am sure not to be a beginner anymore!

The leaves now look very flat, as they are appliqued. I wonder if I should make them 3-dimensional, real leaves, lightly stuffed with a (thin) interface. Or is this too much, because the PP is very flat?

RM: Sandra, I like the roses as you have spread them out more, but there are a couple of places that need adjustment: the roses that are hitting the sides look odd — they need a bit of space between the rose and the inner border — and the two roses that touch at the corner need some separation.

As for the leaves, you could leave them placed as they are, or you could associate them more with the roses — think about how real roses are arranged with their leaves. I think the upper left hand corner might need a leaf — do the roses up there look a little lonely, or am I just being sentimental? 🙂

As for how to create the leaves — you could paper piece them (spirals or not) to incorporate some other colors so they don’t look flat — even just a few diagonal veins might really bring them to life.  If you applique them I like your idea of giving them a little bit of dimension — another way you might do this is to incorporate a tuck (a pinch) that would give them a bit more shape.

From Rhonda Adams 7-9-07:  Meet Sandra and Susanne! Thank you for bridging the ocean with this project. The three of us had the most wonderful time (Thanks to Sandra for all of translating) If ever we have a chance to talk, some of the stories from our day together are worth a thousand quilt patches.  I took this photo of them (and the shop’s owner Hanni) in the little shop in Zurich called Patch Workshop, charming! We are so lucky to have the access to fabrics we do at the prices we do…stash building at Swiss Prices could put a slow down on the temptation. Sandra selected some glorious fabrics while we there, not seeking to make a purchase, this collection called out to her and look at how it inspired her these past few days.

Sandra & Susanne

 SM 8-24-07:  Work is going on. My quilt is nearly finished (Just a few hours).

Sandra Mettler 5 Friends

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13 Responses to “Sandra Mettler”

  1. yogib2 Says:

    Sandra,

    I had sent an earlier message to your quilting buddy Susanne and RaNae so graciously pointed out that I should be in touch with you as you translate for Susanne…any chance either of you live near Zurich? Or Geneva? Any recommendations on shops to visit near to these areas? I’ll be in Zurich next week, and again at the end of the month. Perhaps if you’re close by we could meet for a cup of tea, or….

    Rhonda

  2. RaNae Says:

    Sandra, did you receive the rose templates from Debra? Do they help?

  3. RaNae Says:

    Sandra, if you will tell me what size you want your rose blocks to be, I will export the template and send it to you as a .jpg file. I’m guessing 12″ (30cm)?

  4. RaNae Says:

    From SM: Finally I have a design. Of course, it is not what Debra’s design is. But as you wrote in your email today, for some people its more difficult to design. I want to go forward with this! but my troubles with eq5 will throw me back often.

    So how can I go forward with my design? Is the middle of the hexagon too big? (actually there are 80 pieces per rose!! I wonder, when I sew that! 720 or more little pieces…

    and what about the setting? should I turn and flip some of the roses?

    I bought some wonderful fabrics with small prints in orange. I think, that will look great. I tried to color it in EQ5.

    oops, I just realize, that I choose another type of spiral… is that ok?

    Please Help!

    thank you RaNae for all your work us spiros!

    sandra

    p.s. our meeting with Rhonda Adams in Zurich was …. GREAT! WONDERFUL! We were laughing an joking the hole day! I still can’t believe, that your project is bringing people from all over the world together. That’s great!!!

  5. RaNae Says:

    Sandra, I got the picture in JPG format. Please see my comments above. (Nowt hat you know how to export in JPG format, the next step is to learn how to make the image 10cm x 10cm @ 75ppi, or, in other words, 300 pixels wide). I seet his project is stretching us all in more than just quilting ways! 🙂

  6. opalin Says:

    RaNae
    Yes, you are stretching me! But that is more than good, it is a challenge. And I like it.

    I was not really confident with my setting and your suggestions are what I needed for more practice in EQ5. At the end of this project, I am sure not to be a beginner anymore!

    The leaves now look very flat, as they are appliqued. I wonder if I should make them 3-dimensional, real leaves, lightly stuffed with a (thin) interface. Or is this too much, because the PP is very flat?

    Sandra

    And excuse me again for the picture, which is not in a correct format…

    RM: But at least it was JPG, so I could post, even if it was a bit too large….. thank you!
    And what is “PP” [“…the PP is very flat …”] OH, duh — paper piecing…..

  7. yogib2 Says:

    Hi Sandra…my you have been busy since I saw you earlier this week. I love where your design is headed and kudos to you for taking it on full speed ahead. The fabrics you have selected will be glorious.

    Thank you for the most delightful day in Zurich. It was truly a pleasure to meet both you and Susanne…quilters do make the best of friends 🙂 I can’t even begin to tell you how much fun I had.

    For those of you who may not know, Susanne and Sandra drove to meet me in Zurich, Switzerland during my layover this past Thursday (I am an International Flight Attendant).

    We started our adventure with a trip to one of Switzerland’s well known quilt shops, Patch Workshop owned by the most delightful woman named Hanni (pronounced Honey)…to die for! Of course no trip to a shop is complete without a little stash building…a small stash building at Swiss prices I might add. And then it was on for a cup of coffee and a chat with Sandra translating for both Susanne and I, followed by dinner at one of Zurich’s well known Fondue houses. Some may say it’s all in a day’s work.

    Sandra, I’m sending a note to Susanne in my attempt saying the pleasure was all mine and thank you as well for a wonderful day. Please convey my heartfelt thanks to her as well, and I do hope to see you both again SOON! Happy spiraling.

    Rhonda

    PS Each time I look at a head of garlic, I’ll forever think of toes, not cloves. Thanks for the laughter.

  8. opalin Says:

    Hi everybody

    Back again from holiday in Croatia – which is a very beautiful country – I was busy with my roses. I sewed two of them and I must say, it is easy, but it needs a lot of time… Next time when I am going to sew in our “atelier” I will take some photos.

    And RaNae, I changed my rose from 6 – 5 pointed spiral. The reason is, there are less pieces to sew. And because my time is very limited, that is important. Hope, this will be fine.

    Greetings from Switzerland
    Sandra

    RM: Sandra, thanks for the update. Last year I had a Fulbright scholar from Croatia living with me, and I’m very anxious to visit her in Croatia now. I’m very curious to hear about your trip. Did you visit Dubrovnik?

    More importantly, I’m glad to hear you are making progress on your quilt. If you have time to snap a photo of your revised blocks and send them, I’d love to see how they look. Thank you!

  9. RaNae Says:

    From Sandra & Susanne: RaNae, we had so much fun with our spirals. Working with Susanne is great, because she has a really good eye for color and always a lot of good ideas. And she is a very professional “paper piecer”. I have learned lots of tricks from her during the project. And she has learned from me that EQ5 is sometimes very useful….

    We are both a little bit sad, knowing the project has its end now. Sewing is done…. But, we have a lot of new ideas!

    Thank you so much for taking us in this adventure.

    Greetings
    Sandra + Susanne

  10. yogib2 Says:

    Hi Sandra and Susanne,

    Your quilts will be making the final leg of their journey today 🙂 I plan to hand them off to RaNae in person later this afternoon. It has been such a pleasure enjoying them in my home since their Transatlantic crossing last week. Each time I walk by them I think of you…they are soooo beautiful.

    It was great to see you and I’ve told all my friends about the wonderful restaurant we went to. Thank you for all the hospitality. Please tell Susanne I’m enjoying the honey (yummy) and good luck with her English classes. Looking forward to seeing you again soon.

    Hugs, Rhonda

  11. quilterk Says:

    Hi Sandra,
    I just returned from visiting Rhonda. I got a peak at your table runner. It is gorgeous. Orange is one of my favorite quilting colors and the combination in your flours are wonderful. It is much more spectacular in person. Great job!
    Kathy E

  12. quiltfee Says:

    Those colours are so great together!

    fee

  13. RaNae Says:

    From Sandra: Making such a quilt from the beginning to the end, from designing to quilting, choosing fabrics and and and was a great challenge. Thank you RaNae, I learned a lot from you!sandra

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